Category: programming

Off lines – come unique aged tone

Posted by – June 14, 2016

Offline is the New Luxury (2016, 47 min) from Bregtje van der Haak on Vimeo.

Offline is The New Luxury
Digital networks are forever expanding. Places without cell phone reception or a Wi-Fi connection are increasingly hard to find. If tech companies have their way, the remaining 'white spots' on the digital map will soon disappear, leaving no place on earth unconnected. But what is happening off the grid?

White Spots is a collaborative multimedia project by documentary filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak, visual artist Jacqueline Hassink, and information designer Richard Vijgen. Working in various media, they travel beyond the frontiers of the networked world to explore unwired landscapes, communities and lifestyles, questioning the need to be constantly plugged into a single, seamless planetary tech-topia. Will offline become the new luxury?

This television documentary takes viewers on a tour of the offline world and includes interviews with internet critic Evgeny Morozov, psychologist Sherry Turkle (MIT), Amish minister Norman Yoder (Shipshewana, Indiana), poet and writer Aram Pachyan (Armenia), and Minister of Telecommunications Harin Fernando of Sri Lanka. The documentary is directed by Bregtje van der Haak and produced by VPRO Backlight. It comes with the free White Spots App (for android and iPhone, design Richard Vijgen).

www.white-spots.net
backlight.vpro.nl

Be wind, pass it on

Posted by – April 15, 2014

'Feel Flavour – A Sonic Poster'

Herb & Spice brand Schwartz is all about flavour. But how do you dramatise flavour when flavour is invisible and silent?

Simple: make it possible for people to see, hear and feel it. Print Tech collective, Novalia and ad agency Grey London have collaborated on an interactive poster that uses innovative ‘touch sensitive’ inks to turn the surface area of the paper into an interactive interface.

Illustrator Billie Jean was invited to create a visual articulation of what taste might look like. Each herb and spice depicted in the artwork was then assigned a musical chord matching its flavour characteristic. For example, cumin became E flat major, chilli was ascribed A flat major and fennel was characterised by a higher pitched F minor. The image was then back-printed with an innovative conductive ink, effectively giving the poster capacitive touch technology. When paired with a mobile device via Bluetooth, the poster becomes an interactive musical instrument.

The poster was created as part of a Schwartz promotion designed to target the retail trade.

Credits:

Client: Schwartz
Creative Agency: Grey London
Chief Creative Officer: Nils Leonard
Creative Director: Andy Lockley
Art Directors: Andy Lockley / Andy Garnett
Copywriter: Dan Cole
Creative Producers: Georgie Moran / Lucy Dunn
Original Music: MJ Cole / Soho Music.
Sound design: Holly Clancey
Production Company: Grey Works
Producer: Becky Knapp
DOP: Bruno Downey
Print Production / software developer: Novalia

pay tent come pack rays in book seats

Posted by – December 25, 2013

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A patent (/ˈpætənt/ or /ˈpeɪtənt/) is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state to an inventor or their assignee for a limited period of time, in exchange for the public disclosure of the invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem, and may be a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property.

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Intellectual property (IP) is a legal concept which refers to creations of the mind for which exclusive rights are recognized.[1] Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property rights include copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights, trade dress, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets.

Although many of the legal principles governing intellectual property rights have evolved over centuries, it was not until the 19th century that the term intellectual property began to be used, and not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the majority of the world.[2] The British Statute of Anne (1710) and the Statute of Monopolies (1624) are now seen as the origins of copyright and patent law respectively.[3]

Philips currently holds around 54,000 patent rights, 39,000 trademarks, 70,000 design rights and 4,400 domain name registrations.
The name “Sony” was chosen for the brand as a mix of two words. One was the Latin word “Sonus”, which is the root of sonic and sound, and the other was “Sonny”, a familiar term used in 1950s America to call a boy.[5] The first Sony-branded product, the TR-55 transistor radio, appeared in 1955 but the company name did not change to Sony until January 1958.

678px.rainbowCDsquare

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Red Book (1982)

CD-DA (Digital Audio) – standardized as IEC 60908
CD-Text – a 1996 extension to CD-DA
CD+G (plus Graphics) – karaoke
CD+EG / CD+XG (plus Extended Graphics) – an extension of CD+G

The Red Book, written by Philips and Sony in 1982, contains standards for the original compact disc (CD). It includes the physical characteristics of the CD and CD-DA The Red Book standard defines the format in which an audio CD must be recorded so that it will play correctly on a CD player. Red Book is the basis for all later CD standards and specification documents.

Green Book (1986)

CD-i (Interactive)

The Green Book (sometimes known as the Full Functional Green Book, or FFGN) is the informal name for Philips and Sony’s 1986 specification document for CD-Interactive (CD-i). More properly known as the Compact disc Interactive Full Functional Specification, the document defines a compact disc format and a complete hardware and software system with specialized data compression and interleaving techniques. The Green Book comprises both the CD-i specification and the Microware OS-9 2.4 (the specified operating system) Technical Manual. CD-i was introduced as an interactive multimedia system that could be connected to the television and stereo system and was the first such system based on CD technology.

The Green Book specifies track layout, sector structure, and an ISO 9660-based data retrieval structure. Adaptive differential pulse-code modulation (ADPCM) is used to convert sound to binary information and to store it along with other types of media data. Green Book block structure enables synchronization of the various kinds of data and file compression for multimedia applications. CD-i sectors make use of an 8 byte area left unused by CD-ROM XA, although they are similar otherwise.

Yellow Book (1988)

CD-ROM (Read-Only Memory) – standardized as ECMA-130 and ISO/IEC 10149
CD-ROM XA (eXtended Architecture) – a 1991 extension of CD-ROM

The Yellow Book is the informal name for Philips and Sony’s ECMA-130 standard specification for CD-ROM (Compact Disk, read-only-memory). Published by the two companies in 1988, the Yellow Book is an extension of the Red Book that enables the CD to contain data other than the audio data. In 1989, the Yellow Book was issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as ISO/IEC 10149, Data Interchange on Read-Only 120mm Optical disks (CD-ROM). Because the Yellow Book only defines the physical arrangement of the data on the disk, other standards are used in conjunction with it to define directory and file structures. They include ISO-9660, HFS (Hierarchal File System, for Macintosh computers), and Hybrid HFS-ISO. In addition to the disc specification, optical stylus parameters, the control/display system, and sector structure, the Yellow Book includes modulation and error correction data. Definitions include two data modes, mode 1 and mode 2.

CD-ROM, Mode 1 is the standard data storage mode used by almost all standard data CDs (CD-ROMs). Of the 2,352 bytes of data in each block, 2048 are allocated for the data that the user sees. The remaining 304 bytes are used for added error detection and correction code.

CD-ROM, Mode 2 can contain 2336 bytes of user data. It is the same as Mode 1, except that the error detection and code correction bytes are not included. The Mode 2 format offers a flexible method for storing graphics and video. It allows different kinds of data to be mixed together, and became the basis for another standard known as CD-ROM XA (Extended Architecture). The specification for CD-ROM XA was published as an extension to the Yellow Book in 1991.

Orange Book (1990)

Orange is a reference to the fact that red and yellow mix to orange. This correlates with the fact that CD-R and CD-RW are capable of audio (“Red”) and data (“Yellow”); although other colors (other CD standards) that do not mix are capable of being burned onto the physical medium. Orange Book also introduced the standard for multisession writing.

CD-MO (Magneto-Optical)
CD-R (Recordable) alias CD-WO (Write Once) alias CD-WORM (Write Once, Read Many) – partially standardized as ECMA-394
CD-RW (ReWritable) alias CD-E (Eraseable) – partially standardized as ECMA-395

Orange Book is the informal name for Philips and Sony’s Recordable CD Standard. Published in 1990, the Orange Book is a follow-up to their Red Book CD-DA (Compact disc – Digital Audio) specifications. The Orange Book is divided into two sections: Part I deals with magneto-optical (MO) drives, and Part II deals with the first recordable CD format CD-R (Compact disc – Recordable). Part III, released separately, detailed CD-RW (Compact disc – Rewritable). In addition to disc specifications for the above CD forms, the Orange Book includes information on data organization, multisession and hybrid disks, pre-groove modulation (for motor control during writing), and recommendations for measurement of reflectivity, environment, and light speed.

Orange Book specifications enabled the first desktop disc writing. Formerly, CDs had been read-only music (CD-DA), to be played in CD players, and multimedia (CD-ROM), to be played in computers; after the Orange Book, any user with a CD Recorder drive could create their own CDs from their desktop computers.

Magneto-Optical (CD-MO) technology allows tracks to be erased and rewritten on 12cm CDs that are rated to allow millions of rewrites. These drives use two heads (one to write and the other to erase), in a double-pass process. System information may be permanently written in a small, premastered area, but the rest of the area is available for recording, and re-recording many times.

CD-R products can be written to only once, similarly to WORM (write once, read many) products. A CD-R drive records on CDs that have special recording layers and pregrooved tracks. The first tracks are a program calibration area, which is followed by the Lead-in area (where the table of contents will be written), and the program area (where the user actually records), and a Lead-out area. There are hybrid disks that include read-only and recordable areas.

Rewritable CD (CD-RW) was developed by Philips and Sony in 1996, as an extension to the original Orange Book. This addition specifies the use of Phase Change technology and the UDF to produce a CD that can be rewritten in one pass. CD-RW makes it possible for the user to write and rewrite the disk.

White Book (1993)

CD-i Bridge – a bridge format between CD-ROM XA and the Green Book CD-i, which is the base format for Video CDs, Super Video CDs and Photo CDs.
VCD (Video)
SVCD (Super Video, 1998) – a 1998 extension of VCD, standardized as IEC 62107 in 2000.

The White Book, which was released in 1993 by Sony, Philips, Matsushita, and JVC, is the specification document for Video CD (VCD), and encompasses specifications for track usage, MPEG audio/video track encoding, play sequence descriptors, data retrieval structures, and user data fields. VCD is defined as a particular adaptation of CD-ROM XA (extended architecture) that is designed to hold MPEG-1 video data. The CD-ROM XA sector structure (as detailed in the Yellow Book and ISO 9660) is used to define the physical and logical blocks, and MPEG-1 is used to compress data so that full-screen, full motion video data can be contained on the disc – without compression, the disc could only hold about 2 minutes worth of video. VCD resolution is similar to that of VHS.

White Book specifications include the disc format (such as the use of tracks, for example), a data retrieval structure compatible with ISO 9660, data fields to enable fast forward and reverse, and closed captioning. VCD, Photo CD and Karaoke CD are defined as bridge disks, a format based on CD-ROM XA to enable the disks to work in compatible CD-ROM and CD-i (CD-Interactive) drives. Following the original specifications, VCD 2.0 was released in 1995, VCD-Internet in 1997, and SuperVCD in 1998, all from extensions to the White Book. Disks of this type interleave MPEG video and audio to achieve proper data flow rates.

Blue Book (1995)

E-CD/CD+/CD Extra (Enhanced)

The Blue Book is the informal name for the standard specification document for stamped multisession (also known as enhanced CD or E-CD) disc format, developed in 1995 from a supplement to Philips and Sony’s 1988 Orange Book. The Blue Book defines a format for enhanced CDs that enables inclusion of multimedia data (such as video clips, text, and images) on a standard audio CD. Blue Book disc specifications include audio and other data sessions, directory structures, and image and data formats. The disks play normally on a CD-player, and display the extra data when they are played on a device with multimedia capabilities, such as a computer’s CD-ROM drive, or a CD-i player.

The Blue Book specifies two sessions: up to 99 Red Book audio tracks in the first session (closest to the center of the disk), and a Yellow Book-based data track in the second session (closest to the outside edge of the disk). Other Blue Book details include the Red Book disc specification, file formats (including CD Plus information files), and an ISO 9660-compatible directory structure to organize the various types of data. The Blue Book is supported as a licensed standard definition by Philips, Sony, Microsoft, and Apple. A multisession CD, the CD+ is designed so that the data track cannot be accessed by regular audio CD players, thereby protecting them for damage.

Beige Book (1992)

PCD (Photo)

Scarlet Book (1999)

SACD (Super Audio)

The Scarlet Book is Philips and Sony’s 1999 specification document for Super Audio Compact disc (SACD), a high-resolution audio format that features complex six channel sound. SACD disks can contain three different versions of the same material. SACD uses Direct Stream Digital (DSD) recording, a proprietary Sony technology that converts an analog waveform to a 1-bit signal for direct recording, instead of the pulse code modulation (PCM) and filtering used by standard CDs. DSD uses lossless compression (so-called because none of the data is lost in the compression process) and a sampling rate of 2.8MHz to improve the complexity and realism of sound. DSD enables a frequency response of 100kHz and a dynamic range of 120dB (the ratio of the softest to the loudest sound – 120db is also the approximate dynamic range of human hearing) on all channels. Scarlet Book details include three separate options for disc format: single-layer DSD, dual-layer DSD, or dual-layer hybrid, which includes a Red Book layer that can be played on any existing CD player in addition to the high-density layer that has the capacity to deliver eight channels of DSD. In addition to DSD and the hybrid disc technology, Scarlet Book specifications include: Super Bit Mapping Direct, a proprietary downconversion method that enables improved audio when the disks are played on an ordinary CD player; Direct Stream Transfer, a type of coding that increases data capacity; and a digital watermark to protect against piracy. According to some, SACD is a hybrid CD/DVD format, since Scarlet Book specifications are identical to those for DVD disks for the file system, sector size, error correction, and modultation. SACD is in competition with a similar product, DVD-Audio, as the format that will replace standard audio CD.

Purple Book (2000)

DDCD (Double Density)

The Purple Book is the informal name for Philips and Sony’s specification document for Double Density Compact disc (DDCD) format. By narrowing the track pitch (to 1.1 micron from 1.6 micron), and shortening the minimum pit length (to 0.623 micron from 0.833 micron), the Purple Book enables a CD to hold 1.3 gigabytes, roughly twice the capacity of a standard CD. Other Purple Book specifications include a new type of error correction (known as CIRC7), an adaptation of the ISO 9660 file format, and a scanning velocity of 0.9 meters per second.

info from >
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_Books
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http://library.thinkquest.org/C0112823/greatbooks_cd.htm

Leaves (mix turntablismmm)

Posted by – April 30, 2013

Tweetscapes

Posted by – March 10, 2013

http://heavylistening.com

Carnivore Brain-SyXtems

Posted by – January 22, 2013


From wikipedia . . .

A carnivore (pron.: /ˈkɑrnɪvɔər/) meaning ‘meat eater’ (Latin, carne meaning ‘flesh’ and vorare meaning ‘to devour’) is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.[1][2] Animals that depend solely on animal flesh for their nutrient requirements are considered obligate carnivores while those that also consume non-animal food are considered facultative carnivores.[2] Omnivores also consume both animal and non-animal food, and apart from the more general definition, there is no clearly defined ratio of plant to animal material that would distinguish a facultative carnivore from an omnivore, or an omnivore from a facultative herbivore, for that matter.[3] A carnivore that sits at the top of the foodchain is an apex predator.
Plants that capture and digest insects are called carnivorous plants. Similarly, fungi that capture microscopic animals are often called carnivorous fungi.


The four living species of the Panthera genus (Panthera leo (lion), Panthera onca (jaguar), Panthera pardus (leopard), and Panthera tigris (tiger)) may produce a number of hybrid crosses. These hybrids are often given a compound name reflecting their breeding, while at other times they bear a more traditional name.
Lion ♀ Tiger ♀ Jaguar ♀ Leopard ♀ Liger ♀ Tigon ♀
Lion Lion Liger Liguar Lipard Liliger Litigon
Tiger Tigon Tiger Tiguar Tigard
Jaguar Jaglion Jagger Jaguar Jagupard
Leopard Leopon Dogla Leguar Leopard
Liger X
Tigon X

via wikipedia . . .

Public Beta: “Kodiak”
Main article: Mac OS X Public Beta
On September 13, 2000 Apple released a $29.95[6] “preview” version of Mac OS X (internally codenamed Kodiak) in order to gain feedback from users.[7]
The “PB” as it was known marked the first public availability of the Aqua interface and Apple made many changes to the UI based on customer feedback. Mac OS X Public Beta expired and ceased to function in Spring 2001.[8]
[edit]Version 10.0: “Cheetah”
Main article: Mac OS X v10.0
On March 24, 2001, Apple released Mac OS X v10.0 (internally codenamed Cheetah).[9] The initial version was slow, incomplete, and had very few applications available at the time of its launch, mostly from independent developers. While many critics suggested that the operating system was not ready for mainstream adoption, they recognized the importance of its initial launch as a base on which to improve. Simply releasing Mac OS X was received by the Macintosh community as a great accomplishment, for attempts to completely overhaul the Mac OS had been underway since 1996, and delayed by countless setbacks. Following some bug fixes, kernel panics became much less frequent.
[edit]Version 10.1: “Puma”
Main article: Mac OS X v10.1
Later that year on September 25, 2001, Mac OS X v10.1 (internally codenamed Puma) was released.[10] It had better performance and provided missing features, such as DVD playback. Apple released 10.1 as a free upgrade CD for 10.0 users, in addition to the US$129 boxed version for people running Mac OS 9. It was discovered that the upgrade CDs were full install CDs that could be used with Mac OS 9 systems by removing a specific file; Apple later re-released the CDs in an actual stripped-down format that did not facilitate installation on such systems.[11] On January 7, 2002, Apple announced that Mac OS X was to be the default operating system for all Macintosh products by the end of that month.[12]
[edit]Version 10.2: “Jaguar
Main article: Mac OS X v10.2
On August 23, 2002,[13] Apple followed up with Mac OS X v10.2 “Jaguar”, the first release to use its code name as part of the branding.[14] It brought great raw performance improvements, a sleeker look, and many powerful user-interface enhancements (over 150, according to Apple[15] ), including Quartz Extreme for compositing graphics directly on an ATI Radeon or Nvidia GeForce2 MX AGP-based video card with at least 16 MB of VRAM, a system-wide repository for contact information in the new Address Book, and an instant messaging client named iChat.[16] The Happy Mac which had appeared during the Mac OS startup sequence for almost 18 years was replaced with a large grey Apple logo with the introduction of Mac OS X v10.2.
[edit]Version 10.3: “Panther
Main article: Mac OS X Panther
Mac OS X v10.3 “Panther” was released on October 24, 2003. In addition to providing much improved performance, it also incorporated the most extensive update yet to the user interface. Panther included as many or more new features as Jaguar had the year before, including an updated Finder, incorporating a brushed-metal interface, Fast user switching, Exposé (Window manager), FileVault, Safari, iChat AV (which added videoconferencing features to iChat), improved Portable Document Format (PDF) rendering and much greater Microsoft Windows interoperability.[17] Support for some early G3 computers such as “beige” Power Macs and “WallStreet” PowerBooks was discontinued.
[edit]Version 10.4: “Tiger
Main article: Mac OS X Tiger
Mac OS X v10.4 “Tiger” was released on April 29, 2005. Apple stated that Tiger contained more than 200 new features.[18] As with Panther, certain older machines were no longer supported; Tiger requires a Mac with a built-in FireWire port. Among the new features, Tiger introduced Spotlight, Dashboard, Smart Folders, updated Mail program with Smart Mailboxes, QuickTime 7, Safari 2, Automator, VoiceOver, Core Image and Core Video. The initial release of the Apple TV used a modified version of Tiger with a different graphical interface and fewer applications and services. On January 10, 2006, Apple released the first Intel-based Macs along with the 10.4.4 update to Tiger. This operating system functioned identically on the PowerPC-based Macs and the new Intel-based machines, with the exception of the Intel release dropping support for the Classic environment.[19] Only PowerPC Macs can be booted from retail copies of the Tiger client DVD, but there is a Universal DVD of Tiger Server 10.4.7 (8K1079) that can boot both PowerPC and Intel Macs.
[edit]Version 10.5: “Leopard
Main article: Mac OS X Leopard
Mac OS X v10.5 “Leopard” was released on October 26, 2007. It was called by Apple “the largest update of Mac OS X”. It brought more than 300 new features.[20] Leopard supports both PowerPC- and Intel x86-based Macintosh computers; support for the G3 processor was dropped and the G4 processor required a minimum clock rate of 867 MHz, and at least 512 MB of RAM to be installed. The single DVD works for all supported Macs (including 64-bit machines). New features include a new look, an updated Finder, Time Machine, Spaces, Boot Camp pre-installed,[21] full support for 64-bit applications (including graphical applications), new features in Mail and iChat, and a number of new security features. Leopard is an Open Brand UNIX 03 registered product on the Intel platform. It was also the first BSD-based OS to receive UNIX 03 certification.[22] Leopard dropped support for the Classic Environment and all Classic applications.[23]
It was the final version of Mac OS X to support the PowerPC architecture.
[edit]Version 10.6: “Snow Leopard
Main article: Mac OS X Snow Leopard
Mac OS X v10.6 “Snow Leopard” was released on August 28, 2009. Rather than delivering big changes to the appearance and end user functionality like the previous releases of Mac OS X, Snow Leopard focuses on “under the hood” changes, increasing the performance, efficiency, and stability of the operating system. For most users, the most noticeable changes are: the disk space that the operating system frees up after a clean install compared to Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, a more responsive Finder rewritten in Cocoa, faster Time Machine backups, more reliable and user friendly disk ejects, a more powerful version of the Preview application, as well as a faster Safari web browser.
The rewrite of Finder in Apple’s native Cocoa API allows the Finder to take advantage of the new technologies introduced in Snow Leopard. An update of the web browser, Safari 4, includes a boost in JavaScript and HTML performance, which results in faster web browsing. The majority of this performance boost is enabled by the new SquirrelFish JavaScript interpreter, improving the JavaScript rendering performance of Safari by over 50%.[24] The new Top Sites also displays the most frequently visited and/or bookmarked sites in a panorama view, allowing the user to easily access their favorite sites along with a new Cover Flow view for the user’s browsing history. Safari 4 is now also more crash resistant, being able to isolate plug-ins which are the main cause of web browser crashes.[25]
Mac OS X v10.6 also features Microsoft Exchange Server support for Mail, iCal, and Address Book, new 64-bit technology capable of supporting greater amounts of RAM, an all new QuickTime X with a refreshed user interface and more functionality that used to be only available to QuickTime Pro owners.
Back-end platform changes include improved support for multi-core processors through Grand Central Dispatch which attempts to ease the development of applications with multi-core support, and thus improve their CPU utilization. It used to be that developers needed to code their programs in such a way that their software would explicitly take advantage of the multiple cores, which could easily become a tedious and troublesome task, especially in complex software. It also includes advanced GPU performance with OpenCL (a cross platform open standard for GPGPU distinct from CUDA, Dx11 Compute Shader or STREAM) by providing support to offload work normally only destined for a CPU to the graphic card’s GPU. This can be especially useful in tasks that can be heavily parallelized.
An update introduced support for the Mac App Store, Apple’s digital distribution platform for OS X applications.[26]
Snow Leopard only supports machines with Intel CPUs, requires at least 1 GB of RAM, and drops default support for applications built for the PowerPC architecture (Rosetta can be installed as an additional component to retain support for PowerPC-only applications).[27]
[edit]Version 10.7: “Lion”

Mac OS X Lion was announced at WWDC 2011 at Moscone West.
Main article: Mac OS X Lion
Mac OS X v10.7 “Lion” was released on July 20, 2011. It brought developments made in Apple’s iOS, such as an easily navigable display of installed applications (Launchpad) and (a greater use of) multi-touch gestures, to the Mac. This release removed Rosetta, making it incapable of running PowerPC applications.
Changes made to the GUI (Graphical User Interface) include the Launchpad (similar to the home screen of iOS devices), auto-hiding scrollbars that only appear when they are being used, and Mission Control, which unifies Exposé, Spaces, Dashboard, and full-screen applications within a single interface.[28] Apple also made changes to applications: they resume in the same state as they were before they were closed (similar to iOS). Documents auto-save by default.
[edit]Version 10.8: “Mountain Lion
Main article: OS X Mountain Lion
OS X v10.8 “Mountain Lion” was released on July 25, 2012. It incorporates some features seen in iOS 5, which include Game Center, support for iMessage in the new Messages messaging application, and Reminders as a to-do list app separate from iCal (which is renamed as Calendar, like the iOS app). It also includes support for storing iWork documents in iCloud.[29] Notification Center, which makes its debut in Mountain Lion, is a desktop version similar to the one in iOS 5.0 and higher. Application pop-ups are now concentrated on the corner of the screen, and the Center itself is pulled from the right side of the screen. Mountain Lion also includes more Chinese features including support for Baidu as an option for Safari search engine, QQ, 163.com and 126.com services for Mail, Contacts and Calendar, Youku, Tudou and Sina Weibo are integrated into share sheets.[30]
Notification Center is added in the operating system. It provides an overview of alerts from applications and displays notifications until the user completes an associated action, rather than requiring instant resolution. Users may choose what applications appear in Notification Center, and how they are handled.[31] There are three types of notifications: banners, alerts, and badges. Banners are displayed for a short amount of time in the upper right corner of the Mac’s screen, and the slide off to the right. The icon of the application is displayed on the left side of the banner, while the message from it will be displayed on the right side. Alerts are the same as banners, but will not disappear from the screen until the user takes action. Badges are red notification icons that are displayed on the application’s icon. They tell the number of items available for the application.[32]
Notes, a new notes application, is added. It is now separate from Mail in its own application, with support for desktop notes added (syncs along with its iOS counterpart).[33][34] Created notes are synced through all the user’s Apple devices through the iCloud service. Notes can be arranged in folders, and pinned to the user’s desktop. When the application is closed, the pinned note still remains.
Messages, an instant messaging software application, is added in Mountain Lion. It was announced on February 16, 2012, as part of the OS X Mountain Lion developer preview.[35] Starting with this release, Messages replaces iChat as the default OS X instant-messaging client. A free beta version of Messages was available to download for Mac OS X Lion from the Apple website until late June 2012.[36] The final version of Messages was included with the release version of OS X Mountain Lion.[37]
As with its predecessor, Messages has text messaging, audio, and screen-sharing capabilities. Messages also contains native video conversation support, utilising Apple’s FaceTime video calling application where possible. However, it does retain video capabilities for interfacing with other instant messaging clients.[38][39] Messages supports Apple’s iMessage, a free instant messaging service previously only available on devices running iOS 5. It also supports both XMPP (shown in the application under its former name, Jabber) and the AIM OSCAR. In addition, it also offers a direct connection to Yahoo! Messenger and Google Talk.[36]

via ARA . . .

Our planet is exposed to important natural variations resulting from numerous complex, internal, or external processes. These variations are at the basis of the natural evolution of the Earth climate. Since the late 1880s, human activities add to natural influences that have been present over Earth’s history. Scientific evidence strongly indicates that natural influences cannot explain the rapid increase in global near-surface temperatures observed since the second half of the 20th century.

Ongoing climate research largely relies on an intricate coupling between modelling, which tends to account for an increasing number of processes and their interaction, and observation, which allows complex mechanisms and their parameterization to be studied in details. In particular, space borne observing systems bring global scale data essential to the evaluation of model results and of the assumptions they carry.

Interpretation of space measured radiative fluxes in terms of atmospheric thermodynamics and chemical variables is, in general, extremely complex and mixes numerous scientific domains as: quantum mechanics, from which emission and absorption spectra may be described; the forward modelling of radiative transfer, which allows radiance space measurements to be expressed in terms of the sate of the atmosphere; inverse problem theory and its application to the inversion of the radiative transfer equation; last, statistical methods and tools which open the way to interpreting huge data bases and analysing results of long-term time series.

The Atmospheric Radiation Analysis (ARA) team of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) is one of the few groups in the world to gather all these theoretical skills. This has allowed developing a complete chain designed for processing satellite data at global scale on which rely different research activities aiming at improving our knowledge of the climate variability and evolution.

Geographical maps of high cloud amount (cloud pressure smaller than 440 hPa) for January (left) and for July (right), above: averaged over 8 years (1987-1995, observation time: 7h30/19h30 local timeTOVS Path-B cloud climatology) middle: averaged over 6 year (2003-2008, observation time 1h30/13h30 local time AIRS-LMD cloud climatology) and below: first results from IASI for 2008.

via ncbi.nlm.nih.gov . . .

T-maps of the correlation between the measured (a) or simulated (b) cardiac rate and resting-state fMRI signal timecourses in one slice of a single subject for lags -10 to +10 TR (± 1 minute). The t-values above the threshold are shown overlaid on the first raw EPI image. The t-maps and images have been masked to exclude areas outside the brain. There is a small area of correlation that appears outside the brain where the skull-stripping failed to remove subcutaneous tissue.

From psychcentral . . .

Functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, is a technique for measuring brain activity. It works by detecting the changes in blood oxygenation and flow that occur in response to neural activity – when a brain area is more active it consumes more oxygen and to meet this increased demand blood flow increases to the active area. fMRI can be used to produce activation maps showing which parts of the brain are involved in a particular mental process.

The development of FMRI in the 1990s, generally credited to Seiji Ogawa and Ken Kwong, is the latest in long line of innovations, including positron emission tomography (PET) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which use blood flow and oxygen metabolism to infer brain activity. As a brain imaging technique FMRI has several significant advantages:

1. It is non-invasive and doesn’t involve radiation, making it safe for the subject.
2. It has excellent spatial and good temporal resolution.
3. It is easy for the experimenter to use.

The attractions of FMRI have made it a popular tool for imaging normal brain function – especially for psychologists. Over the last decade it has provided new insight to the investigation of how memories are formed, language, pain, learning and emotion to name but a few areas of research. FMRI is also being applied in clinical and commercial settings.

Aleph Of Emotions

Posted by – January 11, 2013

via Mithru’s website >> more info there with detailed explanation of the project.

Aleph of Emotions is a project that was created during my study at LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore. The project is about emotions and the possible observable patterns in global emotions.

The Aleph, according to author, Jorge Luis Borges, is a point in the Universe where all other points exist. Therefore, anyone looking at the Aleph could see everything in the Universe at once. In this project, I use the Aleph as a metaphor for an archive; Aleph of Emotions refers to an archive of emotions. This archive is produced by data collected from twitter. Data is collected based on keywords that define certain emotions. The results are finally presented with an interactive object.

http://www.mithru.com/projects/aleph.html

Aleph of Emotions is an interactive object that allows users to view worldwide emotions collected from twitter. The camera-like interface allows users to point along a particular direction, focus to a place along that direction and click to view a visualization of emotions in that place. The intention is to explore and find patterns in human emotions with relation to space and time.

Special Thanks to the following people for their guidance and feedback for this project.

Wolfgang Muench
Andreas Schlegel
Adam Aw
Benjamin Low
Jacky Boen
Mui Rui Yi
Zac Ong

Music Source: (Orbique: Always now never after)
http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Orbique/none_given_1578/07_-_orbique_-_dirty_soul_-_always_now_never_after

Data Visualization
Emotions are categorized on the basis of Plutchik’s theory into joy, sadness, trust, disgust, fear, anger, surprise and anticipation. Plutchik also created a wheel-like diagram to explain his theory. In most illustrations, each emotion has a particular colour (see link below). These exact colours were used to visualize each emotion in this project.

Data is visualized for each day of the week and overall as well. The top most bar shows an overall distribution of emotions for the place. Each bar that follows represents a day of the week starting from Sunday.

Yellow represents joy, light green represents trust, dark green represents fear, light blue represents surprise, dark blue represents sadness, pink represents disgust, red represents anger and orange represents anticipation.

more info at LASALLE >>

OKSU

Posted by – July 17, 2012

How much digital content have you recently experienced from screen? And do you still have an easy and convenient access to many of it? It's not easy to remember all the useful sites you've visited and articles you've read.And it is almost impossible to remember it accidentally – we all tend to forget things that are not in front of our eyes.

This is a printer that prints physical links to your digital content. It gives a new degree of freedom to our operations with digital content. Now it is possible to literally give a link to a friend or to make a tangible collection of an articles from a magazines on Ipad.

There is no need for cartridges because of Z-INK paper – the paper have pigment inside. And the smooth instant opening of the content is possible because of NFC technology. Both of it is already exists on market.

This is my diploma project in the British Higher School of Art and Design in Moscow, product design course.

OpenFrameworks and Supercollider

Posted by – March 4, 2012

[nytlabs] Project Cascade

Posted by – September 6, 2011

Cascade allows for precise analysis of the structures which underly sharing activity on the web.

This first-of-its-kind tool links browsing behavior on a site to sharing activity to construct a detailed picture of how information propagates through the social media space. While initially applied to New York Times stories and information, the tool and its underlying logic may be applied to any publisher or brand interested in understanding how its messages are shared.

Cascade was developed by R&D using open source tools including Processing and MongoDB.

Go to project site here or by clicking on images…




Arduino

Posted by – January 10, 2011

This is great… keep it open!

Arduino The Documentary 2010

more info here